Call us toll-free

Ari Elman's undiagnosed bleeding diathesis case

Bleeding diathesis Increased risk for of bleeding (GI, ..

Approximate price

Pages:

275 Words

$19,50

Bleeding diathesis - iSnare Free Encyclopedia

Background: Bleeding in racing horses associated with exercise appears to be multifactorial, and clinical investigation into severe cases rarely occurs. Previously, we reported a severe bleeding diathesis in a Thoroughbred mare. Herein, we describe the cellular physiology of this defect, provide a diagnostic tool for identifying it, and demonstrate that the dysfunction is heritable. Hypothesis: The subject has a heritable defect in platelet secretion that reduces thrombin generation in the absence of additional plasma factors and delays the onset of thrombin production even in the presence of these factors. Animals: The study included 3 clinically normal Thoroughbred horses: the subject and her offspring. Methods: Washed platelets were examined for their ability to (1) translocate phosphatidylserine to the outer leaflet of the platelet membrane as determined by annexin-V binding, (2) generate thrombin as assessed by the activity of the prothrombinase enzyme complex, and (3) bind fibrinogen and form aggregates as determined by flow cytometry. Results: Subject and offspring platelets created procoagulant surfaces by translocating phosphatidylserine. The subject's platelets demonstrated reduced prothrombinase activity, resulting in decreased production of thrombin relative to control platelets. Subject and offspring platelets bound less fibrinogen than control platelets when stimulated with thrombin. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: The subject mare has a transmissible defect that involves reduced generation of thrombin by activated platelets, resulting in decreased aggregation and ineffective clotting. A flow cytometric assay of fibrinogen binding to washed platelets discriminates individuals with this platelet dysfunction and may be useful for discerning subclinical congenital or acquired platelet dysfunctions.

This condition can cause a tendency toward prolonged or excessive bleeding (bleeding diathesis), ..

In (),bleeding diathesis is an unusual susceptibility tobleeding () mostly due to a (adefect in the system of ). Several types aredistinguished, ranging from mild to lethal.

Bleeding Diathesis (Bleeding Disorder): ..

Because spontaneous bleeding occurs rarely during ALF, measures to improve the bleeding diathesis (fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate, platelet transfusion) are recommended only in patients with clinically significant bleeding or before placement of invasive devices.

Factor VII, Factor X, Factor XIII, Factor XI, Factor XII, dysfibrinogenemia / hypofibrinogenemia
Personal history of bleeding diathesis
Family history of bleeding diathesis
Other coagulopathy
Thrombosis/Clotting Disorders

General Conditions Related to Thrombosis That We Treat
Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)
Pulmonary Embolism (PE)
Venous Thromboembolism (VTE)
Cerebral Sinus Thrombosis
Portal Vein Thrombosis
Splenic Vein Thrombosis
Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis
Retinal Vein or arterial Occlusion
Superficial Thrombophlebitis
Catheter Related Thromboembolism
Pre-Transplant Evaluation
Postphlebitic Syndrome
Anticoagulation treatment duration recommendation
Anticoagulation management plan
Anticoagulation bridging plan for surgery or invasive procedure
Factor V Leiden Mutation
Prothrombin Gene Mutation
Protein S Deficiency
Protein C Deficiency
Antithrombin III Deficiency / Antithrombin Deficiency (AT III deficiency)
Hyperfibrinogenemia / Dysfibrinogenemia
Homocysteinemia
MTHFR mutation
Significant elevated levels of Factor VIII or Von Willebrand Factor
Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome
Hypercoagulable state secondary to liver insufficiency or failure
Family history of thrombosis
Family history of inherited thrombophilia (i.e.

Coagulopaties in Horses | Coagulation | Bleeding

AB - Background: Bleeding in racing horses associated with exercise appears to be multifactorial, and clinical investigation into severe cases rarely occurs. Previously, we reported a severe bleeding diathesis in a Thoroughbred mare. Herein, we describe the cellular physiology of this defect, provide a diagnostic tool for identifying it, and demonstrate that the dysfunction is heritable. Hypothesis: The subject has a heritable defect in platelet secretion that reduces thrombin generation in the absence of additional plasma factors and delays the onset of thrombin production even in the presence of these factors. Animals: The study included 3 clinically normal Thoroughbred horses: the subject and her offspring. Methods: Washed platelets were examined for their ability to (1) translocate phosphatidylserine to the outer leaflet of the platelet membrane as determined by annexin-V binding, (2) generate thrombin as assessed by the activity of the prothrombinase enzyme complex, and (3) bind fibrinogen and form aggregates as determined by flow cytometry. Results: Subject and offspring platelets created procoagulant surfaces by translocating phosphatidylserine. The subject's platelets demonstrated reduced prothrombinase activity, resulting in decreased production of thrombin relative to control platelets. Subject and offspring platelets bound less fibrinogen than control platelets when stimulated with thrombin. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: The subject mare has a transmissible defect that involves reduced generation of thrombin by activated platelets, resulting in decreased aggregation and ineffective clotting. A flow cytometric assay of fibrinogen binding to washed platelets discriminates individuals with this platelet dysfunction and may be useful for discerning subclinical congenital or acquired platelet dysfunctions.

N2 - Background: Bleeding in racing horses associated with exercise appears to be multifactorial, and clinical investigation into severe cases rarely occurs. Previously, we reported a severe bleeding diathesis in a Thoroughbred mare. Herein, we describe the cellular physiology of this defect, provide a diagnostic tool for identifying it, and demonstrate that the dysfunction is heritable. Hypothesis: The subject has a heritable defect in platelet secretion that reduces thrombin generation in the absence of additional plasma factors and delays the onset of thrombin production even in the presence of these factors. Animals: The study included 3 clinically normal Thoroughbred horses: the subject and her offspring. Methods: Washed platelets were examined for their ability to (1) translocate phosphatidylserine to the outer leaflet of the platelet membrane as determined by annexin-V binding, (2) generate thrombin as assessed by the activity of the prothrombinase enzyme complex, and (3) bind fibrinogen and form aggregates as determined by flow cytometry. Results: Subject and offspring platelets created procoagulant surfaces by translocating phosphatidylserine. The subject's platelets demonstrated reduced prothrombinase activity, resulting in decreased production of thrombin relative to control platelets. Subject and offspring platelets bound less fibrinogen than control platelets when stimulated with thrombin. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: The subject mare has a transmissible defect that involves reduced generation of thrombin by activated platelets, resulting in decreased aggregation and ineffective clotting. A flow cytometric assay of fibrinogen binding to washed platelets discriminates individuals with this platelet dysfunction and may be useful for discerning subclinical congenital or acquired platelet dysfunctions.

Order now
  • Bleeding_diathesis : definition of Bleeding_diathesis …

    Severe bleeding diathesis associated with invasive aspergillosis in ..

  • Complete resolution of the bleeding diathesis and the ..

    This page includes the following topics and synonyms: Bleeding Disorder, Bleeding Diathesis, Abnormal Bleeding.

  • Patients that have a bleeding diathesis, ..

    bleeding diathesis.

Order now

Bleeding | definition of bleeding by Medical dictionary

N2 - Minor postoperative bleeding is the most common complication of cutaneous surgery. Because of the commonality of this complication, hemostasis is an important concept to address when considering dermatologic procedures. Patients that have a bleeding diathesis, an inherited/acquired coagulopathy, or who are on anticoagulant/antiplatelet medications pose a greater risk for bleeding complications during the postoperative period. Knowledge of these conditions preoperatively is of the utmost importance, allowing for proper preparation and prevention. Also, it is important to be aware of the various hemostatic modalities available, including electrocoagulation, which is among the most effective and widely used techniques. Prompt recognition of hematoma formation and knowledge of postoperative wound care can prevent further complications such as wound dehiscence, infection, or skin-graft necrosis, minimizing poor outcomes.

The Coagulopathy of Chronic Liver Disease — NEJM

AB - In severe preeclampsia/eclampsia a disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)-like syndrome is a prominent feature. Low levels of antithrombin III (AT-III; heparin cofactor) have been described in this syndrome. The objective of this pilot study is to determine whether the low levels of AT-III can be increased to normal by the intravenous administration of purified, concentrated, human AT-III. All patients entered into the study manifested thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, coagulopathy, evidence of liver disease, and/or a bleeding diathesis. Each patient received a dose of AT-III equivalent to the amount in 3,000 ml of plasma. The levels of AT-III as measured by a functional assay were significantly increased (1.5-2x) following the initial 3,000 unit bolus of AT-III and prior to any other blood replacement therapy. The response of individual patients is proportional to the initial level of AT-III. In the control group there was no difference between the predelivery levels of AT-III and those obtained 12-24 hr postpartum. Therefore, the intravenous administration of AT-III may be useful in the treatment of patients with severe preeclampsia or eclampsia.

Lower gastrointestinal bleeding - Wikipedia

N2 - In severe preeclampsia/eclampsia a disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)-like syndrome is a prominent feature. Low levels of antithrombin III (AT-III; heparin cofactor) have been described in this syndrome. The objective of this pilot study is to determine whether the low levels of AT-III can be increased to normal by the intravenous administration of purified, concentrated, human AT-III. All patients entered into the study manifested thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, coagulopathy, evidence of liver disease, and/or a bleeding diathesis. Each patient received a dose of AT-III equivalent to the amount in 3,000 ml of plasma. The levels of AT-III as measured by a functional assay were significantly increased (1.5-2x) following the initial 3,000 unit bolus of AT-III and prior to any other blood replacement therapy. The response of individual patients is proportional to the initial level of AT-III. In the control group there was no difference between the predelivery levels of AT-III and those obtained 12-24 hr postpartum. Therefore, the intravenous administration of AT-III may be useful in the treatment of patients with severe preeclampsia or eclampsia.

Order now
  • Kim

    "I have always been impressed by the quick turnaround and your thoroughness. Easily the most professional essay writing service on the web."

  • Paul

    "Your assistance and the first class service is much appreciated. My essay reads so well and without your help I'm sure I would have been marked down again on grammar and syntax."

  • Ellen

    "Thanks again for your excellent work with my assignments. No doubts you're true experts at what you do and very approachable."

  • Joyce

    "Very professional, cheap and friendly service. Thanks for writing two important essays for me, I wouldn't have written it myself because of the tight deadline."

  • Albert

    "Thanks for your cautious eye, attention to detail and overall superb service. Thanks to you, now I am confident that I can submit my term paper on time."

  • Mary

    "Thank you for the GREAT work you have done. Just wanted to tell that I'm very happy with my essay and will get back with more assignments soon."

Ready to tackle your homework?

Place an order