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This means my hypothesis was right becausemy

When starting the experiment, I thought that the eggs wouldbounce more when kept in vinegar longer.

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I hope this experiment showed that anegg will bounce

The Iberian Peninsula had been the site of wars for several centuries by the , and the Christian/Islamic animosity there was pronounced; enslaving captured opponents was standard practice. Portugal began the maritime innovations that would see them seize the spice trade from their Islamic rivals. is closely associated with the rise of Portuguese maritime knowledge and practice. How responsible Henry was for Portugal’s maritime prowess has long been debated, but what is not debatable is that Portugal began developing the necessary knowledge and skills for accomplishing an unprecedented feat: sailing the world’s oceans. Until that time, only the Indian Ocean was regularly traveled because of its relatively gentle and predictable nature. Not until Europe’s rise were the Pacific, Atlantic, Arctic, and Antarctic oceans regularly traveled. sailors , unsuccessfully, and even settled some Atlantic islands, but Portugal was humanity’s first successful practitioner of transoceanic navigation. Many , and sailed down the Atlantic Coast of Africa and across the Atlantic. The Portuguese began , , and in 1434, Portugal became the first European power to on the African coast.

2. Hypothesis: Students guess “yes” or “no” and their guesses are recorded.

Mass extinction events can seem quite capricious as to what species live or die. generally outcompeted their ancestral for hundreds of millions of years. Ammonoids were lightweight versions of nautiloids, and they often thrived in shallow waters while nautiloids were banished to deep waters. Both dwindled over time, as they were outcompeted by new kinds of marine denizens. In the and mass extinctions, deep-water animals generally suffered more than surface dwellers did, but the nautiloids’ superior respiration system still saw them survive. Also, nautiloids laid relatively few eggs that took about a year to hatch, while ammonoids laid more eggs that hatched faster. However, the asteroid-induced Cretaceous mass extinction annihilated nearly all surface life while the deep-water animals fared better, and nautiloid embryos that rode out the storm in their eggs were survivors. The Cretaceous extinction while and comprise another group of living fossils, although that status is disputed in 2014. was about the only land animal of significance that survived the Permian extinction and it dominated the early Triassic landmass as no animal ever has. It comprised about 95% of all land animals. Why , which was like a reptilian sheep? Nobody , but it may have been the luck of the draw. Perhaps relatively few bedraggled individuals existed in some survival enclave until the catastrophe was finished, and then they quickly bred unimpeded until , for the most spectacular species radiation of all time, at least until humans arrived on the evolutionary scene.

Now for the moment of truth: does your raw and shell-less egg bounce?

There is also evidence that life itself can contribute to mass extinctions. When the eventually , organisms that could not survive or thrive around oxygen (called ) . When anoxic conditions appeared, particularly when existed, the anaerobes could abound once again, and when thrived, usually arising from ocean sediments, they . Since the ocean floor had already become anoxic, the seafloor was already a dead zone, so little harm was done there. The hydrogen sulfide became lethal when it rose in the and killed off surface life and then wafted into the air and near shore. But the greatest harm to life may have been inflicted when hydrogen sulfide eventually , which could have been the final blow to an already stressed ecosphere. That may seem a fanciful scenario, but there is evidence for it. There is fossil evidence of during the Permian extinction, as well as photosynthesizing anaerobic bacteria ( and ), which could have only thrived in sulfide-rich anoxic surface waters. Peter Ward made this key evidence for his , and he has implicated hydrogen sulfide events in most major mass extinctions. An important aspect of Ward’s Medea hypothesis work is that about 1,000 PPM of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, which might be reached in this century if we keep burning fossil fuels, may artificially induce Canfield Oceans and result in . Those are not wild-eyed doomsday speculations, but logical outcomes of current trends and , proposed by leading scientists. Hundreds of already exist on Earth, which are primarily manmade. Even if those events are “only” 10% likely to happen in the next century, that we are flirting with them at all should make us shudder, for a few reasons, one of which is the awesome damage that it would inflict on the biosphere, including humanity, and another is that it is entirely preventable with the use of technologies .

for mass extinctions have been suggested. speculated that extinctions might have regular periodicity, and other scientists have . Around 30 million years is the average time between mass extinctions, which set scientists speculating whether galactic dynamics could be responsible. from supernovas have been proposed as one possible agent, as have , but the periodicity hypothesis has fallen out of favor. The periodic nature of mass extinctions could be because it takes millions of years for complex ecosystems to recover from the previous extinction events and build themselves into unstable states again, when new events cause the ecosystems to collapse.

Results: In conclusion, our hypothesis was correct.

In the early 19th century, a dispute was personified by , a British lawyer and geologist, and , a French paleontologist. Their respective positions came to be known as and . Just as , so did uniformitarianism prevail in scientific circles. Under the comforting uniformitarian worldview, there was no such thing as a global catastrophe. Changes had only been gradual, and only the present geophysical, geochemical, and biological process had ever existed. The British Charles Darwin explicitly made Lyell’s uniformitarianism part of his evolutionary theory and he proposed that extinction was only a gradual process. Cuvier was , which contradicted the still-dominant Biblical teachings, even in the . Although Cuvier did not subscribe to the , his catastrophic extinction hypothesis was informed by his fossil studies. But Lyell and Darwin prevailed. Suggesting that there might have been catastrophic mass extinctions in Earth’s past was an invitation to be branded a pseudoscientific crackpot. That state of affairs largely prevailed in orthodoxy until the 1980s, after the was posited for the dinosaurs’ demise. An effort led by a scientist publishing outside of his field of expertise (a ) removed from its primacy. Only since the 1980s have English-speaking scientists studied mass extinctions without facing ridicule from their peers, which has never been an auspicious career situation. Since then, many and mass extinction events have been studied, but the investigations are still in their early stages, partly due to a dogma that prevailed for more than a century and a half, and Lyell’s uniformitarianism is influential. The ranking of major mass extinctions is even in dispute, , and a was recently .

Before the era of mass extinction investigation that began in the 1980s, a hundred hypotheses were presented in the scientific literature for the dinosaur extinction, but it was a kind of scientific parlor game. Scientists from all manner of specialties concocted their hypotheses. But even during the current era of scientific study of mass extinctions, much is unknown or controversial and even the data is in dispute, let alone its interpretation. Dynamics may have conflated to produce catastrophic effects, such as increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration warming the land and oceans to the extent that otherwise stable on the ocean floor and in permafrost would be liberated and escape into the atmosphere. That situation is to the , , and extinctions, as well as helping end the . Today, there is genuine fear among climate scientists that , as global warming continues and hydrocarbons are burned with abandon, which could contribute to catastrophic runaway conditions. Wise scientists admit that humanity is currently conducting a huge chemistry experiment with Earth, and while the outcomes are far from certain, the .

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  • The Bouncing Egg: Science Project - Prezi

    2. Hypothesis: (guess) Students should make a guess and write down their conclusions.

  • The Bouncing Egg: Science Project

    2. Hypothesis: (guess) Students should make a guess and write down their conclusions.

  • Can you make an egg bounce? - Planet Science

    This is what I predicted in my hypothesis, because more potential energy is gained from a greater height.

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Experiments > Messy > Can you make an egg bounce

However, one of the good things about EEIs is that you can extend the experiment to find conditions that give unexpected results. You could look for sources of error. For instance, when the wire is a short length the current will be large and heating will occur. Heating affects resistance and you should be keeping temperature constant. Perhaps you could place the wire in water (in a beaker) to keep it cool but then it may touch itself and give a 'short' circuit. How would you prevent this; maybe with masking tape, maybe winding it on to a plastic rod so the turns don't touch. You'll want to calculate resistivity so measure the diameter of the wire with a micrometer in several places (does it vary?). Hmmm - this is turning out to be far more interesting than first thought.

Who can get the egg to bounce highest?

About the time that the continents began to grow and began, Earth produced its first known glaciers, between 3.0 and 2.9 bya, although the full extent is unknown. It might have been an ice age or merely some mountain glaciation. The , and numerous competing hypotheses try to explain what produced them. Because the evidence is relatively thin, there is also controversy about the extent of Earth's ice ages. About 2.5 bya, the Sun was probably a little smaller and only about as bright as it is today, and Earth would have been a block of ice if not for the atmosphere’s carbon dioxide and methane that absorbed electromagnetic radiation, particularly in the . But life may well have been involved, particularly oxygenic photosynthesis, and it was almost certainly involved in Earth's first great ice age, which may have been a episode, and some pertinent dynamics follow.

Science Projects: Making Eggs That Bounce

As cells are made to discharge through a load resistor their voltage tends to decrease; the greater the load resistance the slower they discharge. Manufacturers want to ensure their cells maintain a constant voltage for as long as possible. Once the voltage drops too low the device they are powering will not work as well. So you could ask "How does the rate of discharge affect the voltage?" You could make voltage the dependent variable and 'time' the independent variable. Perhaps try several different load resistors as another variable. What size resistor to try? Well a typical 1.5 V dry cell has a capacity of about 700 milliamp-hours so if you want your experiment to be over in 24 hours (using a data logger when you are asleep) then the load resistor would have to draw 29 mA for 24 hours. Using Ohm's Law you can see that a 50 Ω resistor across a 1.5V cell would do the trick. If you want to do it in a single lesson (say an hour) then it would have to be about 1 Ω. That gives you the range. Heavy-duty cells are about 1000 to 1500 mAh and alkaline cells from 1700 mAh to 3000 mAh.

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