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Reviving the ‘double jeopardy’ hypothesis: physical …

T1 - Reviving the "double jeopardy" hypothesis: physical health inequalities, ethnicity and severe mental illness

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Double Jeopardy: To Be Black and Female - Wikipedia

(2009) Exploration of a 'double-jeopardy' hypothesis within working memory profiles for children with specific language impairment. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF LANGUAGE & COMMUNICATION DISORDERS, 44 (2) pp. 236-250. .

Health-Related Quality of Life in Older Adults: Testing the Double Jeopardy Hypothesis

Children’s development and health are shaped by the neighborhoods where they live, learn and play. Children are more vulnerable when they face “double jeopardy,” that is adverse neighborhood conditions coupled with a lack of protective resources, for example, high neighborhood poverty and limited availability of quality early educational opportunities. Data show high prevalence of “double jeopardy” among young black, Hispanic, and American Indian children.

Double jeopardy legal definition of double jeopardy

In section three, four social psychological theories areexplicated in order to ascertain whether they would predict a double jeopardy outcome.

Although scores on complex working memory tasks were also depressed, there was little evidence for a strong interpretation of double‐jeopardy within working memory profiles for these children, rather these findings were consistent with an interpretation of a constraint on phonological loop for children with SLI that operated at all levels of a hierarchical tripartite model of working memory (Baddeley and Hitch 1974).

An empirical test of this hypothesis, using both an objective (mental health status) and a subjective (perceived well‐being) indicator as the dependent variable, reveals a confirmation of double jeopardy using the objective quality of life indicator, but not the subjective indicator.

An Examination of the "Double Jeopardy" Hypothesis

Reviving the "double jeopardy" hypothesis: physical …

Children’s development and health are shaped by the neighborhoods where they live, learn and play. Children are more vulnerable when they face “double jeopardy,” that is adverse neighborhood conditions coupled with a lack of protective resources, for example, high neighborhood poverty and limited availability of quality early educational opportunities. Data show high prevalence of “double jeopardy” among young black, Hispanic, and American Indian children.

Understanding the impact of cancer on HRQOL of older adults from minority backgrounds is of great importance. With the aging of Americans and demographic changes in the ethnic/racial composition of the US population, clinicians need to better anticipate, predict, and treat the physical and mental consequences of cancer and its treatment in specific segments of the population. The current study provides information regarding the physical and mental functioning of older adults from minority backgrounds as well as correlates that can be used to target clinical assessments and interventions. Our study suggests double jeopardy exists in the overall sample and breast cancer survivors, but is explained by differential burden of comorbid conditions in the middle age group for African Americans. Examining the reasons why double jeopardy persists in men with prostate cancer, after controlling for comorbidity warrants further attention. To what extent the compounding effect of age and race on physical function in the middle age group are the result of poorer access to care or delays in screening, and diagnosis in this group is not known, but worthy of future study.

Old and Female: Testing the Double Jeopardy Hypothesis
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  • and this may support my hypothesis that double jeopardy has more ..

    Double jeopardy - Wikipedia

  • minority aged has been characterized as one of double jeopardy.

    16/01/2018 · The double-jeopardy hypothesis also requires that evidence be provided ..

  • the results do not support the double jeopardy hypothesis.

    TITLE Social Interaction, Age, and Ethnicity: An Examination of the "Double Jeopardy" Hypothesis.

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Reviving the 'double jeopardy' hypothesis: physical …

(2009) Exploration of a 'double-jeopardy' hypothesis within working memory profiles for children with specific language impairment. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders, 44 (2) pp. 236-250.

Aging & Autism: Double Jeopardy? | Autism Speaks

Background: Children with specific language impairment (SLI) often experience difficulties in the recall and repetition of verbal information. Archibald and Gathercole (2006) suggested that children with SLI are vulnerable across two separate components of a tripartite model of working memory (Baddeley and Hitch 1974). However, the hierarchical relationship between the 'slave' systems (temporary storage) and the central executive components places a particular challenge for interpreting working memory profiles within a tripartite model. Aims: This study aimed to examine whether a 'double-jeopardy' assumption is compatible with a hierarchical relationship between the phonological loop and central executive components of the working memory model in children with SLI. If a strong double-jeopardy assumption is valid for children with SLI, it was predicted that raw scores of working memory tests thought to tap phonological loop and central executive components of tripartite working memory would be lower than the scores of children matched for chronological age and those of children matched for language level, according to independent sources of constraint. In contrast, a hierarchical relationship would imply that a weakness in a slave component of working memory (the phonological loop) would also constrain performance on tests tapping a super-ordinate component (central executive). This locus of constraint would predict that scores of children with SLI on working memory tests that tap the central executive would be weaker relative to the scores of chronological age-matched controls only. Methods Procedures: Seven subtests of the Working Memory Test Battery for Children (Digit recall, Word recall, Non-word recall, Word matching, Listening recall, Backwards digit recall and Block recall; Pickering and Gathercole 2001) were administered to 14 children with SLI recruited via language resource bases and specialist schools, as well as two control groups matched on chronological age and vocabulary level, respectively. Mean group differences were ascertained by directly comparing raw scores on memory tests linked to different components of the tripartite model using a series of multivariate analyses. Outcomes Results: The majority of working memory scores of the SLI group were depressed relative to chronological age-matched controls, with the exception of spatial recall (block tapping) and word (order) matching tasks. Marked deficits in serial recall of words and digits were evident, with the SLI group scoring more poorly than the language-ability matched control group on these measures. Impairments of the SLI group on phonological loop tasks were robust, even when covariance with executive working memory scores was accounted for. There was no robust effect of group on complex working memory (central executive) tasks, despite a slight association between listening recall and phonological loop measures. Conclusions Implications: A predominant feature of the working memory profile of SLI was a marked deficit on phonological loop tasks. Although scores on complex working memory tasks were also depressed, there was little evidence for a strong interpretation of double-jeopardy within working memory profiles for these children, rather these findings were consistent with an interpretation of a constraint on phonological loop for children with SLI that operated at all levels of a hierarchical tripartite model of working memory (Baddeley and Hitch 1974). These findings imply that low scores on complex working memory tasks alone do not unequivocally imply n independent deficit in central executive (domain-general) resources of working memory and should therefore be treated cautiously in a clinical context

Minority women face "double jeopardy" of racial and …

The double jeopardy hypothesis posits that racial minority elderly suffer a double disadvantage to health due to the interactive effects of age and race. Empirical examinations have found mixed support for the proposition that the aging process heightens the health disadvantage for racial minorities compared to whites. Race-by-age differences are tested using a health-related quality of life measure that has been largely overlooked in previous double jeopardy analyses. The outcome, number of days in poor physical health during the past month, quantifies day-to-day physical well-being in a way not available to standard measures of morbidity and mortality. The data are from the 2003 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) and were analyzed using negative binomial regression. Results show that the magnitude of differences in the number of physically unhealthy days for African Americans and Hispanics compared to their white counterparts is much larger in the elderly strata than that observed between younger groups. Additionally, social characteristics do not fully explain why racial differences in poor physical health days are greater at older ages. A life course perspective is proposed as one possible explanation for the double jeopardy finding. The results indicate a need to consider health-related quality of life outcomes when examining racial/ethnic health disparities among the elderly population. The appendix presents cross-validation of the 2003 CHIS results with the 2005 CHIS and the findings are replicated.

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