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Debating Compression of Morbidity – Fight Aging!

Thus, in Austria ill health seems to be more and more compressed into the later years of life.

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Compression of morbidity - Revolvy

The Compression of Morbidity hypothesis envisions a potential reduction of overall morbidity, and of health care costs, now heavily concentrated in the senior years, by compression of morbidity between an increasing age of onset of disability and the age of death, increasing perhaps more slowly. For this scenario to be able to be widely achieved, largely through prevention of disease and disability, we need to identify variables which predict future ill health, modify these variables, and document the improvements in health that result. Physical activity is perhaps the most obvious of the variables which might reduce overall lifetime morbidity.

Longevity and compression of morbidity from a …

We witness the "M&M"—the morbidity and mortality meeting—where doctors scrutinize their own work and mistakes, and the often inevitable outcomes of treatment.

Compression of morbidity explained

Compression of morbidity | Wiki | Everipedia

Beltran-Sanchez H, and Razak F. 2014. Going beyond the disability-based morbidity definition in the compression of morbidity framework. Global Health Action 7.

N2 - According to the Compression of Morbidity (CM) hypothesis, people who exercise, eat nutritiously, do not smoke, and maintain good weight, i.e., people who practice healthy habits, will be more likely to live free of disabling diseases and injuries up until the last few months or years of life. The Increasing Misery (IM) hypothesis, on the other hand, holds that preventive health measures will extend life expectancy but will also increase the number of infirm years. The CM theory implies that curves of morbidity or disability with age should become increasingly 'rectangular' for groups who practice healthy habits in the broadest sense. The IM theory does not. This Rectangularization hypothesis is examined with cross-sectional data measuring disability from the Epidemiological Follow-up to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, I (NHEFS), using years of schooling as the independent variable proxy representing favored health status, and examining interactions with age. A modified version of the Disability Index (DI) from the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) is used to measure disability. In some analyses, deceased subjects were assigned the worst disability score. Four subsamples of women and men, fifty years old and over, alive and deceased in 1982-84, were analyzed. Female, and especially male, subsamples which included the deceased provided evidence for the CM hypothesis. Results for the subsamples of those remaining alive in 1982-84 were ambiguous. However, lifetime (over age 50) cumulative disability was 21 to 60 percent less for the more educated than the less educated, depending upon whether deceased were included or excluded. If higher education level is an appropriate surrogate for the effect of good health practices, then extending such practices will result in less, rather than more, lifetime disability.

The Avalanche Hypothesis and Compression of Morbidity: ..

We begin with a discussion of the compression of morbidity hypothesis and then we ..

According to the Compression of Morbidity (CM) hypothesis, people who exercise, eat nutritiously, do not smoke, and maintain good weight, i.e., people who practice healthy habits, will be more likely to live free of disabling diseases and injuries up until the last few months or years of life. The Increasing Misery (IM) hypothesis, on the other hand, holds that preventive health measures will extend life expectancy but will also increase the number of infirm years. The CM theory implies that curves of morbidity or disability with age should become increasingly 'rectangular' for groups who practice healthy habits in the broadest sense. The IM theory does not. This Rectangularization hypothesis is examined with cross-sectional data measuring disability from the Epidemiological Follow-up to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, I (NHEFS), using years of schooling as the independent variable proxy representing favored health status, and examining interactions with age. A modified version of the Disability Index (DI) from the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) is used to measure disability. In some analyses, deceased subjects were assigned the worst disability score. Four subsamples of women and men, fifty years old and over, alive and deceased in 1982-84, were analyzed. Female, and especially male, subsamples which included the deceased provided evidence for the CM hypothesis. Results for the subsamples of those remaining alive in 1982-84 were ambiguous. However, lifetime (over age 50) cumulative disability was 21 to 60 percent less for the more educated than the less educated, depending upon whether deceased were included or excluded. If higher education level is an appropriate surrogate for the effect of good health practices, then extending such practices will result in less, rather than more, lifetime disability.

AB - According to the Compression of Morbidity (CM) hypothesis, people who exercise, eat nutritiously, do not smoke, and maintain good weight, i.e., people who practice healthy habits, will be more likely to live free of disabling diseases and injuries up until the last few months or years of life. The Increasing Misery (IM) hypothesis, on the other hand, holds that preventive health measures will extend life expectancy but will also increase the number of infirm years. The CM theory implies that curves of morbidity or disability with age should become increasingly 'rectangular' for groups who practice healthy habits in the broadest sense. The IM theory does not. This Rectangularization hypothesis is examined with cross-sectional data measuring disability from the Epidemiological Follow-up to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, I (NHEFS), using years of schooling as the independent variable proxy representing favored health status, and examining interactions with age. A modified version of the Disability Index (DI) from the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) is used to measure disability. In some analyses, deceased subjects were assigned the worst disability score. Four subsamples of women and men, fifty years old and over, alive and deceased in 1982-84, were analyzed. Female, and especially male, subsamples which included the deceased provided evidence for the CM hypothesis. Results for the subsamples of those remaining alive in 1982-84 were ambiguous. However, lifetime (over age 50) cumulative disability was 21 to 60 percent less for the more educated than the less educated, depending upon whether deceased were included or excluded. If higher education level is an appropriate surrogate for the effect of good health practices, then extending such practices will result in less, rather than more, lifetime disability.

nor would it be possible to identify compression in the length of ..
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  • Compression of morbidity and active ageing: key …

    Cross‐national evidence for the validity of the compression of morbidity hypothesis originally proposed by Fries is ..

  • Compression of morbidity and active ageing: ..

    The Compression of Morbidity.

  • Compression of Morbidity: Miscellaneous Comments About …

    21/07/2016 · In the 1980s, Fries formulated the morbidity compression hypothesis (Beltran-Sanchez et al

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Education, gender, and the compression of morbidity …

Early in his career, he foresaw a society in which the active and vital years of life would increase in length, the onset of morbidity would be postponed, and the total amount of lifetime disability would decrease.

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